The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini tells a powerful

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini tells a powerful, impactful tale of the protagonist Amir’s journey of redemption. The story begins with Amir expressing his sorrow for his sin which he committed in his homeland, Afghanistan, when he was a child. This sorrow is later revealed to be the result of him witnessing his friend and half-brother Hassan being raped. Fueled by guilt, Amir travels to America with his father to escape his past. Eventually, though, Amir returns to Afghanistan only to discover Hassan’s death. He is a given a choice, however, upon discovering Hassan’s only son Sohrab is alive and being abused by the same man who raped his father. Amir, managing mustering great courage, rescues Sohrab atoning for is sin. Through his guilt, from his actions, and learning through his experiences Amir has achieved redemption.
Redemption is a process, and it requires the seeker to feel deep regret for their actions. Amir is immediately struck with guilt upon committing his atrocity to Hassan acknowledging he became an insomniac because of it (86). This guilt sparked the first step in his redemption as it itself requires the person to feel a sense of guilt to add meaning and purpose. Without guilt, one lacks genuine sorrow thus rendering them either physically or mentally unable to atone. Amir compares himself to a “monster in the lake”, and it is apparent from the moment he says this he wishes to atone for the sin (86). Unfortunately, young Amir fails to recognize a fundamental lesson taught by Rahim Khan: “A man who has no conscience, no goodness, does not suffer.” (301). Without correcting the offense immediately, he allows guilt to compile throughout the coming years in his life foreshadowing his eventual return to Afghanistan.
Forgiveness is an integral component of redemption both of