INTRO For the Middle East GPC enrichment

INTRO
For the Middle East GPC enrichment, I watched the movie Kite Runner, directed by Marc Foster. This movie follows the friendship of Amir, a sensitive and intelligent son of a wealthy businessman, and Hassan, a loyal, forgiving, and good-natured servant. The guilt of not standing up for Hassan begins to eat Amir up. Amir begins to think that life would be better without Hassan around so he falsely accuses him of theft and gets him kicked out of his house. Soon after, Baba and Amir are forced to leave Afghanistan due to an ongoing conflict with the soviet union. They travel to the United States where Amir gets married to his lady love Sourya and matures as a person. Just when Amir’s life seemed to settle down, he gets a call from an old friend still in Afghanistan. In Afghanistan Amir learns about Hassan’s death and the danger his son, Sohrab, is under. Amir sees this as an opportunity to atone for his past sins and ends up rescuing Sohrab. This movie provides great insight into the role of women and the cruelty towards Hazaras in Afghan society
This movie gave me insight into women experience double standards in Afghan society through Amir’s interactions with Soraya and the smear on Soraya’s character due to her past incident. There are many examples in the Kite Runner where these women are controlled in their decisions because that is what they are meant to do in the Afghan culture Women and men are not meant to mix too much,. When Soraya and Amir speak at the flea market,women passing shameful glances at Soraya for talking to Amir. However Soraya has no choice in whether she wants to marry Amir, it is General Taheri who must agree that Amir is suitable She has to go through the traditional marriage. These incidents illustrate how women in Afghan society are condoned and must live up to the strict expectations that Afghan culture has imposed .When Amir and Soraya are allowed to be alone for the first time after their engagement, Soraya shares with him her biggest secret. She tells Amir about brief relationship she had in Virginia while she was unmarried and is afraid that sharing this secret might change Amir’s mind on the wedding .She speaks ironically of the double-standard she sees between men and women –”Their sons go out to night clubs looking for meat and get their girlfriends… Oh, they’re just men having fun! I make one mistake… and I have my face rubbed in it for the rest of my life.” This shows how women must live up to the Afghan idea of “decency” and not doing so would result in a loss of good reputation is nearly impossible to earn back once it is lost, but men are excused for ‘just having fun. . Afghan culture lives by very strict rules, which restrict their actions and every day decisions.Sorya previous belief proves that the Afgan culture of male dominance is still present in many afghans even out of AfganistanI was shocked at the mistreatment of Hazara’s, or the servant class, in Afghani culture. We see how Amir is given the right to a good education and is regarded highly in society due to his birth as a Pashtun.. Assef even tried justifying rape, something many of us considers an unforgivable sin by referring to Hassan just as hazara. if Hassan was not even human being, displaying the ultimately racist attitude that they possessed. Afghanistan is the land of Pashtuns. It always has been, always will be. We are the true Afghans, the pure Afghans, not this Flat-Nose here. His people pollute our homeland, our watan. They dirty our blood.This give impression that Afghanistan is a highly racist place that is unpleasant especially for Hazaras.Throughout the movie this discrimination b/n classes is quite evident. This attests to how someone born a Pashtun has privileges that are not afforded to those who are born Hazara. This also shows how Afgan society had dehumanized the Hazara class. Another example of this is seen in the kite flying tournament, where every Pashtun boy was accompanied by a Hazara to hold the spool. Hazaras were used like tools and the Pashtuns took their anger out on Hazaras when they didn’t win /” When Amir and Hassan participate in kite flying competition. Amir controlled the kite and Hassan was the kite runner. This already show the domination Amir has over Hassan. Another shocking contrast was the birthdays of Amir and Hassan. Hassan was just given a slingshot, which Amir explicitly states was for the sole purpose of his own protection. On the other hand, Amir had a huge celebratory party for his birthday and received many presents. This is shocking not only because there is such a big difference between two birthdays but also because we later find out that Hassan and Amir were half-brothers. This shows how two brothers didn’t even have the same birthday celebration just because of their races.
The Kite Runner describes the culture and traditions (customs) and of the Afghan people in this movie about a family that emigrates from Afghanistan to the United States after the Soviet invasion. Part of the Afghan culture includes traditional competitions. Amir explains the ‘Buzkashi tournament…on the first day of spring, New Year’s Day…was, and still is, Afghanistan’s national passion.’ Buzkashi is a dangerous game in which men on horseback fight to try to put a goat or cattle carcass in a scoring circle. When Armir goes to the Buzkashi tournament with Baba, he is traumatized when ‘one of the chapandaz (horsemen) fell off his saddle and was trampled under a score of hooves.’
Another tradition is the annual kite fighting contest. Boys cut their hands as they steer kites tied to glass string to try to cut other kites out of the air. The flyer of the last kite standing is the winner.Kite flying is part of every Afghan childhood Eid-e-Quorban is a celebration of the near sacrifice of his son that Ibrahim almost made for God. the custom of sacrificing a sheep. According to Amir, ‘the custom is to divide the meat in thirds, one for the family, one for friends, and one for the poor.’ Baba gives all the meat to the poor. After selecting a special sheep, Baba feeds it a cube of sugar before slicing its throat. Dating is not common practice -Sparks conflict within Afghan-American communitBride and groom are underneath a shawl and a mirror wrapped in cloth and a copy of Qur’an is shown. -Couple see each other’s reflection in mirror (symbolizes purity and cleanliness)”We did ‘Ayena Masshaf’,where they gave us a mirror and threw a veil over our heads, so we’d be alone to gaze at each other’s reflection” (180).

Kite flying-; 100 year old tradition-Competitive, but seen as art
For the Middle East GPC enrichment, I watched the movie Kite Runner, directed by Marc Foster. This movie is set in Afghanistan, and follows the unlikely friendship between Amir, son of a wealthy businessman, and Hassan, a loyal, and good-natured servant. One triumphant day Amir wins the prestigious annual kite flying but when Hassan goes to retrieve a kite, Amir has downed. However he is confronted by Assef, the local bully, who rapes him for not giving him the kite. Amir witnesses this assault but does nothing about it. The guilt of not standing up for Hassan begins to burden Amir. Soon after, Amir and Baba are forced to escape to America, due to the Soviet Union’s invasion. Years later, Amir – now an accomplished author living in San Francisco – is called back to Kabul to right the wrongs he and his father committed years ago. There, Amir learns about the death of Hassan, who is revealed to be Amir’s stepbrother. Hassan’s son has fallen into the clutches of Taliban extremists. Amir sees this as an opportunity to atone for his past sins and reconcile for his cowardice by rescuing Sohrab.

The Kite Runner displays the culture and traditions of the Afghan people. Kite flying is as a common activity in Kabul – pairs of young children fly the kite, cutting down other kites in the process and then ‘running’ after them to catch the kites as a prize; The flyer of the last kite standing is the winner. Eid-e-Quorban is a celebration of the near sacrifice of his son that Ibrahim almost made for God. The custom of sacrificing a sheep. According to Amir, ‘the custom is to divide the meat in thirds, one for the family, one for friends, and one for the poor.’ Amir imagines that its imminent sacrifice is for a higher purpose
This movie gave me insight into how women experience discrimination
in Afghan society. When Amir starts courting Soraya, She tells Amir about a brief relationship she had in Virginia while she was unmarried, and they still haunt her .She was considered no longer a good match for any suitors. A woman in Afghan society must maintain a good reputation and adhere to the traditional standards of behavior. Women symbolize honor of family, as well as protected so they can maintain moral purity. This contrasts with how a military soldier was excused entirely for wanting to rape someone else’s’ wife in exchange for letting a truck pass by. These two incidents illustrate the double standards for women in Afghan society; however, men are excused for as “just having fun.”
One thing that shocked me was the mistreatment of Hazaras, or the servant class, in Afghani society. In the movie, we see how Amir is given the right to a good education and is regarded highly in society due to his birth as a Pashtun. On the other hand, Hassan is a constant target of bullying solely because of his race as a Hazara. Assef even justifies Hassan’s rape, something which we consider an unforgivable sin, by referring to him just a Hazara, as if Hazaras are not even considered human beings. This attests to how someone born a Pashtun has privileges that are not afforded to those who are born Hazara.

We might find our self-esteem lacking because of shame or guilt from our past. The lesson from The Kite Runner is that when life presents us with new opportunities we can make different choices, we can face our fears, and we can grow as a person. We can develop those characteristics and traits that we value and become the person we want to become. The Kite Runner is not only an emotional roller coaster of redemption, but also gives the viewer glimpses of the discriminatory nature of Afghan society, their culture and tradition
The Kite Runner is an emotional roller coaster in Amir’s journey to redemption. Kite runner makes a bold argument about how when life presents us with different opportunities we must face them in order to grow as a person
Spanning from the final days of Afghanistan’s monarchy to the atrocities of the Taliban reign, an epic tale of fathers and sons, of friendship and betrayal, an unlikely friendship develops between Amir, the son of a wealthy Afghan businessman, and Hassan, a servant to Amir and his father. During a kite-flying tournament, an unspeakable event changes the nature of their relationship forever. As an adult haunted by the childhood betrayal, Amir seeks redemption by returning to his war-torn native land to make peace with himself and reconcile his cowardice.
All is well the day Amir and Hassan win a citywide kite-fighting competition. But when Hassan goes to retrieve a kite Amir has downed, he’s ambushed by an older bully named Assef. Assef pummels the smaller boy—then rapes him. Amir secretly watches the assault and does nothing to defend his friend. The result is a gulf of guilt Amir can’t cross. And he makes more choices that utterly separate him from his friend. Regret stalks Amir as he grows up Then he’s given a shot at redemption when a friend of his father’s asks him to come to Pakistan. Why? Hassan’s son has fallen into the clutches of Taliban extremists.

The socioeconomic conditions in Afghanistan demonstrate the disparity between the majority (Sunni Muslims) and the minority (Shi’a Muslims) and how people discriminate against each other based on physical features and religious beliefs. Throughout the novel, Khaled Hosseini depicts the oppression and persecution of the Hazara ethnic group in Afghanistan at the hands of the ruling Pashtuns3)Women in Afghanistan are treated as inferior beings to men and women experience double standards.There are many examples in the Kite Runner where these women are controlled in their decisions because that is what they are meant to do in the Afghan culture:
However ,Soraya has no choice in whether she wants to marry Amir, it is General Taheri who must agree that Amir is suitable. She has to go through the traditional marriage
.saurya ,who is haunted by talks of a brief relationship she had in Virginia while she was unmarried. She speaks ironically of the double-standard she sees between men and women –”Their sons go out to night clubs looking for meat and get their girlfriends… Oh, they’re just men having fun! I make one mistake… and I have my face rubbed in it for the rest of my life.”
This shows that Soraya regrets what she has done but cannot seem to escape it. She knows it is unfair, that women experience double standards, and wants people to stop talking about it.

Women and men are not meant to mix too much, and free mixing between genders only takes place in families.When Soraya and Amir speak at the flea market they only do so when the General is not there as he would not allow it. When he does find out that they have been meeting he tells gently that it is not allowed for him and Soraya to do that, even in her mother’s presence. . We are also shown short shots of women passing shameful glances at Soraya for talking to Amir
LaterAmir finds out that Jamila is an amazing singer, but the General refuses to let her sing in public. She wanted to sing at the wedding, only one song, however she was not allowed to. She obediently only sings for her husband due to his demand
Hassan’s briefly mentioned wife, Farzana, was beaten as Hassan watched helplessly for speaking out to a man in the marketplace (Hosseini). Women were not to speak loudly or out of turn, and no woman should walk outside of the home unless escorted by a man.Women in Afghan culture lives by very strict rules, which restrict their actions and every day decisions. Here are just a few simple things which, even now, Afghan women are expected to do.

Hosseini also critiques the sexism and racism of Afghan society throughout the book. Ali and Hassan are Hazaras, an ethnic group that most Afghans (who are Pashtun) consider inferior, though Hosseini makes it clear that Hassan is Amir’s equal and in many ways morally and intellectually superior
It takes a special kind of heartlessness not to be moved by moments in The Kite Runner, Monsters Ball director Marc Forster’s adaptation of Khaled Hosseini’s bestselling novel. 
. In a divided country on the verge of war, two childhood friends, Amir and Hassan, are about to be torn apart forever. It’s a glorious afternoon in Kabul and the skies are bursting with the exhilarating joy of a kite-fighting tournament. But in the aftermath of the day’s victory, one boy’s fearful act of betrayal will mark their lives forever and set in motion an epic quest for redemption. Now, after 20 years of living in America, Amir returns to a perilous Afghanistan under the Taliban’s iron-fisted rule to face the secrets that still haunt him and take one last daring chance to set things 
with stunning landscape, photography and authentic recreation of an Afghanistan peasant community, that takes us through marketplaces and mountainous terrain
This genuine, heartfelt adaptation may actually open the hearts and minds of viewers to Afghanistan and its tortured history. The audience of which I was part, applauded and cheered at the close of our screening, so my hope is that word-of-mouth will help secure its reputation.

when he’s called back home to Kabul, and accepts his mission only after learning the truth about Hassan. Amir’s act of heroism isn’t entirely satisfying. As young boys, Amir should have helped Hassan, regardless of his societal status. They were friends, after all. “The Kite Runner” might be unaware that Amir is still nothing like his father; a man who was willing to take the bullet from a Russian soldier to protect some strange woman from being raped
The Kite Runner shows us that in life no matter our shame, guilt, or mistakes we have made in the past we will be presented with new opportunities to make different choices and opportunities for personal growth. Amir was given an opportunity to face his fears, stand up to his nemesis and his father-in-law, and demonstrate his loyalty and courage….

Moreover, different themes he uses to represent Afghan culture include kite flying, loyalty, courage, honor, discrimination and hierarchy
The Kite Runner’ is not only an emotional roller coaster of redemption, but also expresses abstract views on politics.

Afghan PoliticsThe country was ravished by violence and war. First the invasion of the Soviet Union and then the tribal wars between the local warlords and tribes during the rule of the Taliban.Kite FightingFor Amir, Kite Fighting is the only way to win his father’s love. It’s also very symbolic. When Hosseini paints us a picture of hundreds of kites trying haphazardly and with great determination to cut each other down, he shows us also the warring factions of Afghanistan overthrowing one another.

LoyaltyWhen Assef tells Hassan that he would let him go if given Amir’s kite, Hassan refuses and takes the beating and rape instead of giving in. Another example is when Hassan is confronted byAssef and his Taliban Army at Baba’s house, and he holds his ground in an attempt to protect his fathers house and possessions.

HonorIn Afghan culture, honor is everything. Hence, Baba does not tell Amir that Hassan is his half brother. If the society had heard that Baba had slept with his servant’s wife, rumors would spread and destroy his social standing. DiscriminationThe Kite Runner tackles the issue of ethnic discrimination in Afghanistan with an example of the relationship between Pashtuns and Hazaras. Baba’s father sets an example for him of being kind to Hazara people, even though they are historically demeaned and persecuted.

THE film The Kite Runner exposes the beauty of Afghan culture and is a touching, stirring tale about a country on the verge of war
The Kite Runner is a touching, stirring tale about a country on the verge of war just as the once rock-solid friendship between Amir and Hassan collapses.

Honor in Afghanistan culture: is defined as the reputation and worth of a person and the people that person is associated with. Honor in Afghanistan derives from the behavior surrounding the protection of women, dress code, social interaction, and education. If one’s honor has been questioned, they feel shamed and will look for a way to seek revenge for themselves and group/family.

It’s here where the first major setting change occurs, as we are thrust into Kabul, Afghanistan from years past when Amir was just a young boy. This portion of the film is portrayed entirely in Dari, with English subtitles, which really adds a great touch to the film. If it had been in English completely, I don’t think I would have found it as effective. The child actors were natives of the language, but the adult actors had to learn it for the film. Rather than “Americanize” the film, placing this part in a native language captures the cultural element and maintains a sense of cultural pride.

Kite-running is displayed as a common activity in Kabul – pairs of young children fly the kite, cutting down other kites in the process and then ‘running’ after them to catch the kites as a prize. Hassan is constantly doing whatever it takes for Amir – running kites, standing up for him, assisting him in any way possible. This, however, is not a display of culture, but more of loyalty, honor and friendship – despite the status quo. Ethnically determined social roles essentially require Hassan to suffer on Amir’s behalf.

Amir will never be the same, as his lack of courage will forever haunt him. Hassan and his father relocate. In 1979, the Soviets invade Afghanistan and Amir and his father flee to Pakistan – illustrating another part of the region’s culture and history.  Amir meets an Afghan woman, speaks to her on several occasions and proceeds to ask her father for her hand in marriage – something you wouldn’t typically find in American culture. Their timid, respectful relationship would be difficult to find in America in present day. The two are married, complete with wedding traditions from Afghanistan,
 Amir’s father, however, is ill. He goes to a doctor, only to find that the doctor is Russian; his earlier sentiments about the Communists come back, and he walks out of the physician’s office without a diagnosis. This scene particularly reflects the health care context of intercultural communication; although there is no language barriers, stereotypes are present, and even though his very life is at risk, Amir’s father isn’t able or willing to break the stereotype.

As he returns to Kabul under the Taliban control, he finds it is very different than the land he knew as a young boy. This illustrates the changes in Afghanistan culture due to the Taliban. 
The novel takes a look at life in Afghanistan, the Soviet invasion, and the rise of the Taliban, and provides valuable life lessons of friendship, culture and being “good.”
The majority of the novel is set in the heart of Afghanistan, though portions also take place in California and Pakistan, making this story truly unique and definitely applicable to research for intercultural communication. The switch between settings allows readers to see a contrast of cultures, as well as have a view of how cultures develop and change over time. Cultural patterns, stereotypes and intercultural issues in the contexts of education and health care are other key points that will be discussed further in this paper.

The movie takes a look at life in Afghanistan, the Soviet invasion, and the rise of the Taliban, and. The switch between settings allows viewers to see a contrast of cultures, as well as have a view of how cultures develop and change over time. The Kite Runner is a unique novel (and film) because of its portrayal of Afghanistan culture as well as its stark comparisons between cultures of the United States and Afghanistan. The Kite Runner’ Set in Afghanistan and the United States, The Kite Runner is a that illustrates the similarities as well as the differences between the two countries and the two vastly different cultures.

Growing up in Kabul, Amir and Hassan are inseparable friends. As an adult living in California, Amir remains haunted by a childhood incident in which he betrayed Hassan’s trust. When he learns that the Taliban has murdered Hassan and wife, Amir returns to his homeland to learn the fate of the couple’s son.

Amir is a young Afghani from a well-to-do Kabul family; his best friend Hassan is the son of a family servant. Together the two boys form a bond of friendship that breaks tragically on one fateful day, when Amir fails to save his friend from brutal neighborhood bullies During a kite-flying tournament, an unspeakable event changes the nature of their relationship forever. As an adult haunted by the childhood betrayal, Amir seeks redemption by returning to his war-torn native land to make peace with himself and reconcile his cowardice
Baba gives all the meat to the poor. After selecting a special sheep, Baba feeds it a cube of sugar before slicing its throat. Amir imagines ‘the animal see that its imminent sacrifice is for a higher purpose
.

Kite flying-> 100 year old tradition-Competitive, but seen as art-Part of every Afghan childhood
The objective of kite flying is to slice the other flier’s string with your own. For Amir, Kite Fighting is the only way to win his father’s love. It’s also very symbolic. When Hosseini paints us a picture of hundreds of kites trying haphazardly and with great determination to cut each other down, he shows us also the warring factions of Afghanistan overthrowing one another.

Amir will never be the same, as his lack of courage will forever haunt him. Hassan and his father relocate. In 1979, the Soviets invade Afghanistan and Amir and his father flee to Pakistan – illustrating another part of the region’s culture and history. The story then progresses a few years, to 1988 in California. This portion of the film offers a great take on the view of Afghans in the United States, as well as the stereotypes often portrayed here
.Amir sets out on a mission to return to Kabul and retrieve the boy.As he returns to Kabul under the Taliban control, he finds it is very different than the land he knew as a young boy. This illustrates the changes in Afghanistan culture due to the Taliban. Buildings are destroyed, the streets are patrolled, and Amir is even forced to don a turban and a fake beard to disguise him from being recognized. The film shows a Taliban stoning of adulterers, as well as confrontation between Amir and a Taliban official,
Dating is not common practice
Bride and groom are underneath a shawl and a mirror wrapped in cloth and a copy of Qur’an is shown. Couple see each other’s reflection in mirror (symbolizes purity and cleanliness)”We did ‘Ayena Masshaf’,where they gave us a mirror and threw a veil over our heads, so we’d be alone to gaze at each other’s reflection” (180).

Honor. Hence, Baba does not tell Amir that Hassan is his half brother. If the society had heard that Baba had slept with his servant’s wife, rumors would spread and destroy his social standing. DiscriminationThe Kite Runner tackles the issue of ethnic discrimination in Afghanistan with an example of the relationship between Pashtuns and HazarasAfghan PoliticsThe country was ravished by violence and war. First the invasion of the Soviet Union and then the tribal wars between the local warlords and tribes during the rule of the Taliban.

an unlikely friendship develops between Amir, the son of a wealthy Afghan businessman, and Hassan, a servant to Amir and his father. During a kite-flying tournament, an unspeakable event changes the nature of their relationship forever. As an adult haunted by the childhood betrayal,
CONCLUSION
The Kite Runner is one of those films that leaves you emotionally reeling while, paradoxically, filling you with hope and gratitude. I think it would be nearly impossible not to reflect on your own relationships and the places you’ve failed—and need grace as well—after watching this movie.

The path to those ends is unquestionably wrenching. Amir’s betrayal of his friend is heartbreaking—all the more because Hassan’s loyalty never wavers. And that, in turn, makes Amir’s willingness to risk his life to save Sohrab all the more poignant. We see that forgiveness, change and freedom are not just possible, but that they are the only way life can continue.

 Gods love is unconditional. Even if a thief, murder or a rapist comes to HIM and seeks forgiveness, HE does not think for a moment before blessing that person. We humans cannot do it, and therefore we are humans. Though not of the same proportion, but we have all done mistakes in life – small or big. We have all cheated someone, betrayed someone’s trust at some stage – sometimes knowingly, sometimes not. If you have realised that and felt the guilt, then you have the power to convert that guilt into great work. You can overcompensate by doing something fabulous for the impacted person. Guilt, therefore, can lead to greatness.Remember there is always a way to be good again.

This quote shows how powerful religion is especially in Afghanistan. It also show how cruel they are to those who don’t follow the words and way of God and how they take measures into their own hands and not in the hands of God himself.

This portion of the film is portrayed entirely in Dari, with English subtitles, which really adds a great touch to the film. If it had been in English completely, I don’t think I would have found it as effective, placing this part in a native language captures the cultural element and maintains a sense of cultural pride
Hassan is constantly doing whatever it takes for Amir – running kites, standing up for him, assisting him in any way possible. This, however, is not a display of culture, but more of loyalty, honor and friendship – despite the status quo. Ethnically determined social roles essentially require Hassan to suffer on Amir’s behalf
Amir’s father runs a service station, which is a stereotypical career for an immigrant in the United States
Amir meets an Afghan woman, speaks to her on several occasions and proceeds to ask her father for her hand in marriage – something you wouldn’t typically find in American culture. Their timid, respectful relationship would be difficult to find in America in present day. The two are married, complete with wedding traditions from Afghanistan, offering yet another glimpse into that culture. Amir’s father, however, is ill. He goes to a doctor, only to find that the doctor is Russian; his earlier sentiments about the Communists come back, and he walks out of the physician’s office without a diagnosis. This scene particularly reflects the health care context of intercultural communication; although there is no language barriers, stereotypes are present, and even though his very life is at risk, Amir’s father isn’t able or willing to break the stereotype
provides valuable life lessons of friendship, culture and being “good.” making this movie truly unique and definitely applicable to research for intercultural communication
Amir and Hassan become separated, and as first the Soviets and then the Taliban seize control of Afghanistan, Amir and his father escape to the United States to pursue a new life
Soraya, one of the main women in the Kite Runner although she lives in America, is still treated under Afghan rules by her parents and people who meet her. Because she ran off with a man before she was married she was considered no longer a good match for any suitors. Soraya ran away with an Afghan man when she was 18, it bought shame to her family and she had no suitors after the incident had been spread around by gossips A woman in Afghan society must maintain a good reputation and adhere to the traditional standards of behaviour. Women symbolize honor of family, community and nation and must be controlled as well as protected so they can maintain moral purity.she has made mistakes in the past and they still haunt her. Soraya had ran away with an Afghan man when she was eighteen years old.  She had lived with this man for a month.  She was not married to him.  Because of this shameful act Soraya had no suitors.  In her culture it was alright for a man to act in this way, but not a woman.  This act brought shame among the family.  
Soraya, one of the main women in the Kite Runner although she lives in America, is still treated under Afghan rules by her parents and people who meet her. Because she ran off with a man before she was married she was considered no longer a good match for any suitors. Soraya ran away with an Afghan man when she was 18, it bought shame to her family and she had no suitors after the incident had been spread around by gossips A woman in Afghan society must maintain a good reputation and adhere to the traditional standards of behaviour. Women symbolize honor of family, community and nation and must be controlled as well as protected so they can maintain moral purity.she has made mistakes in the past and they still haunt her. Soraya had ran away with an Afghan man when she was eighteen years old.  She had lived with this man for a month.  She was not married to him.  Because of this shameful act Soraya had no suitors.  In her culture it was alright for a man to act in this way, but not a woman.  This act brought shame among the family